Chloroquine resistant malaria prophylaxis

Discussion in 'Chloroquine 150 Mg' started by Rolliki, 21-Feb-2020.

  1. sinij New Member

    Chloroquine resistant malaria prophylaxis


    -Suppressive therapy should continue for 8 weeks after leaving the endemic area. Approved indication: For the suppressive treatment of malaria due to Plasmodium vivax, P malariae, P ovale, and susceptible strains of P falciparum CDC Recommendations: 300 mg base (500 mg salt) orally once a week Comments: -For prophylaxis only in areas with chloroquine-sensitive malaria -Prophylaxis should start 1 to 2 weeks before travel to malarious areas; should continue weekly (same day each week) while in malarious areas and for 4 weeks after leaving such areas.

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    Chloroquine shouldn’t be used for treatment of P. falciparum infections from areas of chloroquine resistance or malaria occurring in patients where chloroquine prophylaxis has failed. Despite the growing stories due to resistance of parasite to chloroquine in some parts of the world. this drug remains one of the most widespread to malaria remedy. CDC has no limits on the use of chloroquine for the prevention of malaria. Chloroquine is the drug of choice for people who travel to these areas; however, resistance to chloroquine is now widespread in all areas of the world where malaria is endemic, but it is still an effective choice for prophylaxis in travelers to Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, Argentina.

    Approved indication: For acute attacks of malaria due to P vivax, P malariae, P ovale, and susceptible strains of P falciparum CDC Recommendations: Chloroquine-sensitive uncomplicated malaria (Plasmodium species or species not identified): 600 mg base (1 g salt) orally at once, followed by 300 mg base (500 mg salt) orally at 6, 24, and 48 hours Total dose: 1.5 g base (2.5 g salt) Comments: -For the treatment of uncomplicated malaria due to chloroquine-sensitive P vivax or P ovale, concomitant treatment with primaquine phosphate is recommended. 60 kg or more: 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) orally as an initial dose, followed by 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally after 6 to 8 hours, then 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally once a day on the next 2 consecutive days Total dose: 2.5 g chloroquine phosphate (1.5 g base) in 3 days Less than 60 kg: First dose: 16.7 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (10 mg base/kg) orally Second dose (6 hours after first dose): 8.3 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (5 mg base/kg) orally Third dose (24 hours after first dose): 8.3 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (5 mg base/kg) orally Fourth dose (36 hours after first dose): 8.3 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (5 mg base/kg) orally Total dose: 41.7 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (25 mg base/kg) in 3 days Comments: -Concomitant therapy with an 8-aminoquinoline compound is necessary for radical cure of malaria due to P vivax and P malariae.

    Chloroquine resistant malaria prophylaxis

    Malaria Prophylaxis. The ABCD of Malaria Prophylaxis. Patient, Medicines for the Prevention of Malaria While Traveling.

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  7. Malaria Information and Prophylaxis by Country; Country Areas with Malaria Drug Resistance 2 Malaria Species 3 Recommended Chemoprophylaxis 4 Key Information Needed and Helpful Links to Assess Need for Prophylaxis for Select Countries

    • Malaria Information and Prophylaxis, by Country B - CDC.
    • Recommended Malaria Prophylaxis for Travelers.
    • Malaria Travel & Health Guide, 2019 Online Book.

    Blood stage prophylaxis is the most common type of prophylaxis in use. Chloroquine, was the first drug in this group to be extensively used. It was introduced in the early 1950’s for the prevention of both falciparum and vivax malaria. While chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum appeared quite quickly, in the late 1950’s, chloroquine-resistant P. vivax presented only in the late 1980’s. Chloroquine should not be taken for prophylaxis by patients with a history of epilepsy. Precautions If the condition of the patient deteriorates after administration of chloroquine, resistance must be suspected and quinine must be administered intravenously as an emergency measure. Chloroquine should not be used for treatment of P. falciparum infections acquired in areas of chloroquine resistance or malaria occurring in patients where chloroquine prophylaxis has failed. Patients infected with a resistant strain of plasmodia as shown by the fact that normally adequate doses have failed to prevent or cure clinical malaria.

     
  8. Dennis Well-Known Member

    Hydroxychloroquine is widely used in the treatment of post-Lyme arthritis. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of TLR7 and TLR9 Mechanism. Chloroquine for research Cell-culture tested InvivoGen Chloroquine To Block Immune Activation - pdf attached
     
  9. Hwoarang_81 Well-Known Member

    Hydroxychloroquine is widely used in the treatment of post-Lyme arthritis. Hydroxychloroquine uses & side-effects PatientsLikeMe DailyMed - HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE SULFATE tablet Hydroxychloroquine Plaquenil Side Effects & Dosage for.
     
  10. useses XenForo Moderator

    Plaquenil Oral Interactions with Other Medication Does Plaquenil Interact with other Medications? Severe Interactions. These medications are not usually taken together. Consult your healthcare professional e.g. doctor or pharmacist for more in.

    Plaquenil and Naproxen drug interactions - eHealthMe
     
  11. Flexibell XenForo Moderator

    Chloroquine - WikEM Most malaria-endemic areas have high rates of chloroquine resistance. Per the CDC, chloroquine-sensitive areas include Central America west of the Panama Canal, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and most of the Middle East. See CDC malaria information by country for details. Uncomplicated malaria treatment 1000 mg PO, followed by 500mg PO at 6.

    Malaria - Chapter 4 - 2020 Yellow Book Travelers' Health CDC